Mooring

Mooring

Mooring in a marine environment refers to the securing of a yacht or boat to a fixed point, generally with chain or rope or a combination of the two.

Moorings can be broadly divided into:

  1. Shoreside e.g....

Subcategories

Mooring in a marine environment refers to the securing of a yacht or boat to a fixed point, generally with chain or rope or a combination of the two.

Moorings can be broadly divided into:

  1. Shoreside e.g. Jetties, pontoons (fingers), piers, harbour walls but could also include any convenient tree or rock.

    • Mooring alongside a fixed structure (along her length) with several lines to share the load and restrain her movement

    • Mooring stern to (perpendicular to the shore) with stern mooring lines to the shore and utilising anchor lines deployed beyond her bow to maintain her angle to the shoreline

  2. Permanent Anchor Mooring: permanent attachment to the sea bed at a single fixed point or as part of a series.

    • Swinging Mooring – also known as a single or simple mooring is generally a single anchor or weight laid on the sea bed and connected to a buoy on the surface. A mooring that is attached to a series of anchors or weights on the sea bed (also known as a trot) is still a swinging mooring if the connection is individual i.e. allows swing, Swinging refers to the fact that a yacht secured to a single point will be able to turn full circle in either direction according to the wind and tide. The buoy can be identifiable as a yacht’s home or as a visitor mooring Sea bed mooring points vary from purpose designed anchors to concrete weights according to local conditions. The sea bed anchor is normally attached to the mooring buoy with a chain known as the riser. A yacht is generally attached to the mooring buoy with a substantial, chafe protected mooring rope commonly referred to as a strop or a bridle.

    • Pile Mooring: poles driven into the bottom of the sea bed or river bed in a regular line with their tops protruding the surface to a serviceable height. A yacht positions herself in line and between two piles and deploys mooring lines fore and aft to a heavy steel ring on the pile (which may slide up and down with the tide).

  3. Running or Travelling: a fixed anchorage on the seabed with a block attached. A long line is reeved through the block and each end led back to the shoreline where it is spliced together to form an endless loop. A rope is attached to the running rope to act as a riser. This type of mooring is very popular for dinghies and tenders which can be therefore be moored at a distance from the shore but easily pulled back in for embarkation.

Jimmy Green Marine group all the products associated with Mooring together in one category and subdivide them according to their different uses:

  • Mooring Warps, Lines, Strops, Bridles, Chain and Rope Combination Strops
  • Fenders – yacht protection while mooring
  • Mooring Accessories – shackles, swivels, anti-chafe solutions, mooring compensators
  • Mooring Buoys
  • Bow Thrusters – for improved mooring manoeuvrability
Mooring Information